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Social Justice Ireland has more than 25 years experience in producing comprehensive, budget proposals and budget analysis.  All of this material and other budget resources are available in this section.

Each year, on the day after the annual Budget is announced, Social Justice Ireland produces an analysis and critique of that Budget. Included in that document is an assessment of the direct distributive impact of the measures announced by Government. These principally capture changes to income taxes, welfare payments and other universal payments/entitlements.  This document reproduces the most recent analysis, following Budget 2016, and also provides more details on the approach taken by Social Justice Ireland to generate these results.

Budget 2016 was the fifth regressive Budget in a row. While it was not as regressive as in previous years and contained some gain for everyone, there was much more for the better off and far less for poor and vulnerable people. 

While single unemployed people will gain €95 a year, single people earning €75,000 will gain almost ten times as much i.e. €902.  In the case of couples, the unemployed will gain €157 a year while a couple with two earners on €125,000 a year will gain nine times as much i.e. an extra €1,408 a year.

The expenditure and taxation changes in successive budgets have had a significant impact on households in Ireland, particularly those with children and on low incomes.  In advance of Budget 2016 being announced on 13th October Social Justice Ireland presents an examination of the impact of successive Budgets from 2009 to 2015 on families and low income households in Ireland.

Some tax proposals currently being considered by Government should be rejected because they would give far greater benefit to people earning higher incomes while giving nothing to lower income employees according to a study conducted by Social Justice Ireland.   The study shows that four of seven options to reduce income tax currently being considered would be profoundly unfair because they would favour only those with higher incomes.

Social Justice Ireland has called on Finance Minister, Michael Noonan TD, to RAISE taxes and not reduce them in the Budget for 2016.  This is not the time for Tax-Cuts. All available resources should be used to invest in addressing Ireland’s major deficits, in areas such as caring, housing and poverty that affect the young, the old and most in between.

The Government’s Spring Statement is unfair, contradictory and disappointing.  It lacks a clear guiding vision of where Ireland should be by 2020.  It also lacks clear policy commitments that would move Ireland towards being a just society.

Social Justice Ireland welcomes the publication of the ESRI Special Article examining the ‘Distributional Impact of Tax, Welfare and Public Service Pay Policies: Budget 2015 and Budgets 2009-2015’.  The ESRI report confirms Social Justice Ireland’s analysis that Budget 2015 was the fourth regressive budget in a row and a budget which widened the rich-poor gap.

Fourth regressive Budget in a row

Budget 2015 is the fourth regressive budget in a row.  While it contains a number of welcome initiatives and positive developments, overall the Budget is deeply disappointing.

Some income tax proposals currently being considered by Government should be rejected because they would give far greater benefit to people earning higher incomes while giving nothing to lower income employees according to a new study conducted by Social Justice Ireland.

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