You are here

Articles for 2015's budget

Budget 2016 was the fifth regressive Budget in a row. While it was not as regressive as in previous years and contained some gain for everyone, there was much more for the better off and far less for poor and vulnerable people. 

While single unemployed people will gain €95 a year, single people earning €75,000 will gain almost ten times as much i.e. €902.  In the case of couples, the unemployed will gain €157 a year while a couple with two earners on €125,000 a year will gain nine times as much i.e. an extra €1,408 a year.

The expenditure and taxation changes in successive budgets have had a significant impact on households in Ireland, particularly those with children and on low incomes.  In advance of Budget 2016 being announced on 13th October Social Justice Ireland presents an examination of the impact of successive Budgets from 2009 to 2015 on families and low income households in Ireland.

The Government’s Spring Statement is unfair, contradictory and disappointing.  It lacks a clear guiding vision of where Ireland should be by 2020.  It also lacks clear policy commitments that would move Ireland towards being a just society.

Social Justice Ireland welcomes the publication of the ESRI Special Article examining the ‘Distributional Impact of Tax, Welfare and Public Service Pay Policies: Budget 2015 and Budgets 2009-2015’.  The ESRI report confirms Social Justice Ireland’s analysis that Budget 2015 was the fourth regressive budget in a row and a budget which widened the rich-poor gap.

Fourth regressive Budget in a row

Budget 2015 is the fourth regressive budget in a row.  While it contains a number of welcome initiatives and positive developments, overall the Budget is deeply disappointing.

Reducing taxes is not Social Justice Ireland's priority for Budget 2015. Any available money should be used to improve Ireland's social services and infrastructure, reduce poverty and social exclusion and increase the number of jobs.