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Policy Issues Home

A wide range of material on many policy issues is available on this page.  This includes both material and commentary from Social Justice Ireland and material from other sources.  The policy issues are listed alphabetically in the menu on this page.

There is one dominant framework or paradigm concerning work that is accepted in 
most of the western world. This paradigm equates meaningful work with paid 
employment. It asserts that full time jobs are available for everyone seeking them, 
that these jobs will provide adequate income for people holding them and their 
„dependants‟ and that good social insurance will be available for people who are sick 
or unemployed. In this way everyone will have meaningful work, adequate income, 

An overview of the borrowing  needs of fifteen major developed-country governments in 2011 shows that Ireland is the country in the middle in borrowing needs when measured as a percentage of GDP. According to the International Monetary Fund  (IMF) Japan, USA, Greece, Belgium Italy, France and Portugal all require a higher percentage of Gross Domestic Product (GDP) to finance their budgets in 2011. All require more than 20 per cent of GDP.

TAX BREAKS result in the Irish exchequer forgoing €11 billion in income annually, according to a research paper presented at the Dublin Economics Workshop in Kenmare. The paper was written by two members of the Commission on Taxation: Dr Micheál L Collins, an economist at TCD, and Mary Walsh, a chartered accountant.

The Full Document can be downloaded below

The issue of literacy has been contentious in recent times. The Department of Education’s policy for tackling literacy problems among adults is in the opinion of Social Justice Ireland simply unacceptable.

Irish public opinion continues to increase its support for  stronger EU economic governance, Along with the Finns, Ireland showed a 13% rise in those who want stronger European measures and coordination to combat the economic crisis, with a total of 77% in favour.

Comhar, Ireland’s Sustainable Development Council, has published its research report, ‘Creating Green Infrastructure for Ireland’ (August 24, 2010). The full report may be accessed here. A leaflet providing some key points may be accessed here

The National Economic and Social Council (NESC) has published a report, The Euro: an Irish Perspective. It is part of a broader study being conducted by NESC on Ireland and the EU.
 
On the Euro the Council’s analysis shows that:

Government publishes Infrastructure Investment Priorities 2010-2016

Government published its Infrastructure Investment Priorities 2010-2016 on July 26, 2010. The 131-page document outlines the financial framework for capital investment in the period 2010-2016. Given economic developments in recent years the expected substantial reduction on the expenditure promised in the National Development Plan 2007-2013 is outlined.

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