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Policy Issues Home

A wide range of material on many policy issues is available on this page.  This includes both material and commentary from Social Justice Ireland and material from other sources.  The policy issues are listed alphabetically in the menu on this page.

Homelessness in Ireland has reached another all-time high. Most shockingly, the increase of 7.5 per cent in a month (more than 700 people) was driven mainly by increased child-homelessness. There are now almost 10,000 homeless people in Ireland. This includes 3,755 children.

The Council of Europe recently passed a resolution in favour of a Universal Basic Income.  Social Justice Ireland has long advocated for its introduction into Ireland.  It's time has come.

The proportion of people of working age in the regions further away from Dublin that have jobs has fallen by far more than on the eastern side of the country since the financial crisis.

If people in employment can’t be guaranteed a life free from poverty then there is something seriously wrong. The failure to make tax-credits refundable is no longer acceptable. It would make Ireland’s tax system fairer, address part of the working poor problem, and improve the living standards of around a quarter of a million people in Ireland at an affordable cost.

Large multinationals are paying significantly lower tax rates than they were before the financial crisis. Companies’ effective tax rates have fallen 9 per cent over the last decade, despite some efforts by politicians to tackle aggressive tax avoidance.

Government needs to move away from reliance on the private rented sector to provide solutions to Ireland's housing crisis.  This was echoed by the OECD last week in their recommendation that Ireland seek longer-term solutions that prioritise housing supply.  Cost-rental may provide one such public housing solution which allows the State to recover the cost of housing provision while providing security of rent for tenants currently experiencing double-digit rent inflation.

Social Justice Ireland recommends a Minimum Effective Rate of 6 per cent. This would only affect companies who are currently availing of effective rates lower than that on a regular basis; something that is quite unacceptable.

The consultation on the National Action Plan for Social Inclusion 2018 to 2021 has been released by the Department of Employment Affairs and Social Protection with a closing date of 16th March 2018.  This consultation is open to all, organisations and individuals, and while Social Justice Ireland encourages all to participate, we are concerned that the questions are framed in such a way as to allow Government to abdicate their responsibilities to the most vulnerable.

Successive Governments have continued to look to private entities to deliver public services.  This has given rise to a regulatory emphasis on safeguarding competition rather than protecting the consumer, leaving households dependent on essential services at the mercy of market forces.   The recommendations in a recent OECD report provide salutary advice.

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