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Policy Issues Home

A wide range of material on many policy issues is available on this page.  This includes both material and commentary from Social Justice Ireland and material from other sources.  The policy issues are listed alphabetically in the menu on this page.

The Government’s proposed National Asset Management Agency (Nama) will buy loans worth €77 billion at a discount of 30 per cent. The Minister for Finance Brian Lenihan told the Dáil that NAMA would pay approximately €54bn for loans it takes over from Irish banks. According to the Minister this amount is an estimate based on the long-term economic value of the assets against which the loans were secured.

The European Commission's strategy for the EU until 2020 is deeply flawed and would not be acceptable under any circumstances as a meaningful basis on which to proceed to articulate a vision to guide the EU in the coming decade.

The worst economic and financial crisis in decades has hit Europe hard with a sharp economic 
contraction. The unemployment rate is set to rise to double digit figures in 2010, a level not 
seen for a decade. 
 
Collective action to save the financial system and to boost demand and confidence through 
public intervention has helped to prevent an economic meltdown. However, the crisis has 
weakened our resilience. The EU now needs to make a stronger effort to work together to 

2010 has been designated by the European Union as the European Year for Combating Poverty and Social Exclusion.

A series of activities is being organised by the Irish Government to mark this year.  We will keep you posted on these events on this website.

2010 has been designated by the European Union as the Eluropean Year for Combating Poverty and Social Exclusion.

The latest statistics covering the 27 countries in the European Union show that 17% of the total population of the EU is at risk of poverty. One in five of all children (20%) are at risk of poverty and 19% of older people are in this situation. The comparable figures provided on Ireland by Eurostat are a little out of date.  They state that: 16% of the total population are at risk of poverty, 18% of children and 21% of people aged 65 and above.

An integrated and balanced approach, which takes into account the well-being of individuals and of society, is required in responding to the economic crisis’ according to the National Economic and Social Council (NESC). In its recent report NESC argues that economic and social progress are complementary, so that social well-being is a central element in economic recovery.

When this Government took office in June 2007, few foresaw that record levels of 

Despite signs that the recession is slowing in Ireland as well as in many other countries, the short-term labour market outlook remains grim according to the OECD. In its Employment Outlook 2009, published on September 16, 2009, it states that latest OECD projections indicate a further decline in economic activity in Ireland in 2009, with a muted recovery surfacing only in 2010.

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