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Policy Issues Home

A wide range of material on many policy issues is available on this page.  This includes both material and commentary from Social Justice Ireland and material from other sources.  The policy issues are listed alphabetically in the menu on this page.

The full text of the Honohan Report on the Irish Banking Crisis Regulatory and Financial Stability Policy can be  can be downloaded below. 

This Report covers the period from the establishment of the FR in 2003 to the end of 

The Regling Watson Preliminary Report on the Sources of Ireland's Banking Crisis can be can also be downloaded below

There is no justification for reducing social welfare rates. Research produced by Social Justice Ireland shows that the take-home pay of TDs rose by €848 a WEEK since 1986 while unemployment benefit rates only rose by €135 in the same period. Government ministers’take-home pay rose by more than €1,533 a WEEK in the same period.

The tax wedge in Ireland remained one of the lowest in the OECD in 2009 with 24 countries out of 30 taking a higher percentage from single people on the average wage and 27 countries taking more from a family on an average wage according to the OECD’s annual publication ‘Taxing Wages’ published on May 11, 2010. This is the case despite the fact that Ireland increased the tax wedge in 2009 on single people with average wages by 1.5 percentage points and on families with

This country has come a long way since we introduced the State guarantee 18 months ago. Back then, our banks were on the brink of financial collapse and our economy had gone into reverse. Revenue had fallen steeply and unemployment had risen sharply. For the first time in a quarter of a century, we were experiencing negative growth.
 

POVERTY is something we cannot afford, according to the European Commissioner for employment, social affairs and inclusion.

Some legislators in Ireland are still working with illusions when it comes to measuring poverty. A meeting of the Joint Oireachtas Committee on European Affairs on March 25, 2010 saw a number of members of Ireland's Dail and Senate comment on what they thought the basis for measuring poverty was.

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