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Policy issues concerning Education

Two studies published recently by the Central Statistics Office show that a greater percentage of graduates from Higher and Further education were in substantial employment one year after graduation than in 2010, and that the higher the educational attainment, the higher the income.  Education has the capacity to be transformative, particularly for those in lower socioeconomic groups.  Government must prioritise equality of both access and opportunity to education for all.

Investment in education at all levels and throughout the life cycle can deliver a more equal society and prepare citizens to participate in a democracy. Social Justice Ireland has proposed a €429m education package for Budget 2020 that includes investment in areas such as adult literacy, DEIS, skills development, and community education.

Investing in lifelong learning and adult education is vital to prevent future skills mismatches and to ensure no-one is excluded from an ever changing labour market. 

The headline social inclusion targets addressed in the Irish National Reform Programme are focussed on employment, education and ‘poverty and social exclusion’.  How is Ireland performing on the social inclusion aspects of our National Reform Programme and our Europe 2020 targets?

Among the key findings from the National Social Monitor - European Edition are that quality of housing, the burden of housing costs, financial distress, difficulty in making ends meet and the environment are key issues in Ireland and across the European Union.  As we face into European Elections in May these issues are certain to feature strongly.

With reports this week of another multi-national aiming to replace call centres with Artificial Intelligence (AI), Ireland needs to invest in human capital to prepare for the impact of digitalisation.


Time for Government to commit to a long-term funding strategy for higher education.

700,000 on healthcare waiting lists, 500,000 homes without broadband, over 11,000 people homeless – a result of Government policy failing to tackle causes - Social Justice Ireland publishes National Social Monitor Winter 2018.

The Government has failed to respond adequately to our nation’s housing crisis. There are almost 87,000 households on social housing waiting lists - over half of whom are families - and 10,000 homeless, of whom 3,600 are children. This is a national emergency. The impact of homelessness and precarious housing on our nation’s children will be felt for generations to come.

A new study released today by the CSO reminds us that despite our improved economic performance, one in six Irish people are still living in poverty.

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