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Policy issues concerning European Union

A more comprehensive European approach to dealing with the region's debt crisis is needed to help Ireland regain access to debt markets, the International Monetary Fund (IMF) said on Friday May 20, 2011.    The IMF went on to say that Europe needed to address the risk of financial stress in its periphery through a more "comprehensive" plan. 

This revised version was published following completion of the quarterly review for the end of the first quarter of 2011.

  The review andd the ratification process will be completed by:

The opening session of the UN Commision on Sustainable Development in New York saw the EU input totally ignoring the pollution, poisoning and impoverishment caused by many mining corporations.

While the texts produced by the Irish Government and the ECB/IMF/EU following the latter's review of Ireland's progress in implementing the Bailout agreement contained little information on changes or adjustments to the agreement, the latter's statement contained one blatent claim that seriously insults Ireland's poorest and most vulnerable people. 

The following is the full text of the statement by the ECB/IMF/EU team on completing their review of Ireland's Bailout. The statement was issued on April 15, 2011.

This is the information supplied by the Irish Government on the revisions to the EU/IMF Bailout negotiated at the end of the second quarter of this Bailout. It was supplied on April 15, 2011.

EU/IMF Programme of Financial Support for Ireland 

The recent spring European Council (i.e. heads of Government in the EU) gave the final go-ahead for a comprehensive package of measures to preserve the financial stability of the eurozone and to strengthen economic governance. Both of these initiatives have implications for Ireland and raise serious questions concerning the real commitments of the European Council and the EU generally to proceed in a balanced and inclusive manner.

The political and social achievements of Europe are under threat. Public over 
indebtedness, particularly in a context of crisis, exposes states to pressures to cut back 
investment in the field of social protection, access to health-care, education and housing. 
This reduces their ability to take action against inequalities and discrimination. The 
disappearance of jobs as a result of company relocations and technological change in the 

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