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Policy issues concerning Global South

A brief snapshot on how Ireland's is responding to the global challenges of migration and implementing the Sustaianble Development Goals.

Ireland should continue to play an active and effective part in promoting genuine development in the Global South and to ensure that all of Ireland’s policies are consistent with such development.  In order to do this Ireland should now move towards being a leader in the implementation of the Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) and reaching the ODA target of 0.7% GDP by 2021.

The United Nations summit for the adoption of the post-2015 development agenda will be held from 25 to 27 September 2015, in New York and convened as a high-level plenary meeting of the General Assembly.   The draft outcome document and the 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development will be discussed, finalised and adopted.

We are focussing far too much on the performance of the economy and not nearly enough on issues such as aging, social housing and sustainability, that have major implications for the wellbeing of individuals and society as a whole according to the National Social Monitor 2015 published by Social Justice Ireland.  It goes on to argue that a balance is required between the various aspects of life if the wellbeing of this and future generations is to be secured.

Ireland can and should play a prominent role in the development of Sustainable Development Goals for the planet in 2015.  Government should also commit to ensuring it reaches the ODA target of 07.% GNP by 2020. A full analysis of the policy challenges and proposals on the Global South are outlined in our Socio-Economic Review 2015 ‘Towards a Just Society’.  The chapter is available below.

Even if global greenhouse gas emissions are cut to the level required to keep global temperature rise below 2°C this century, the cost of adapting to climate change in developing countries is likely to reach two to three times the previous estimates of $70 billion-$100 billion per year by 2050, according to a new United Nations Environment Programme (UNEP) report.

Social Justice Ireland welcomes the publication by The World Bank of a report on Basic Income schemes in 28 Sub-Saharan countries.  Entitled The Cash Dividend: The rise of cash transfer programs in Sub-Saharan Africa, by Marito Garcia and Charity M. T. Moore concludes that many positive outcomes can already be identified as flowing from these cash transfer programmes. 

There are 920m people in the Global South living on less than $1.25 a day. In a world with resources many times what is required to eliminate global poverty this situation is intolerable according to the latest Policy Briefing fromSocial Justice Ireland.  

CAFOD, the UK development aid organisation, has warned that the World Bank’s ‘Doing Business’ rankings are actively harming the poor. This is a further example of a tendency in international agencies to use data selectively which then provides an inaccurate analysis which, in turn, leads on to inappropriate policy recommendations. 

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