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Policy issues concerning Government

Tax cuts will not solve Ireland’s infrastructure problems, will not improve social services and will not deliver a fairer society.  Government, at the National Economic Dialogue, should take a long-term view and promote the common good by using all available resource to invest in Ireland’s social and physical infrastructure and services. This approach would lay the foundations for Ireland to deal with the many social, economic and demographic challenges it is currently facing and generate social and economic returns for the state.

Social Justice Ireland's Socio Economic Review 2014 'Steps Towards a Fairer Future' is a 320-page Review which analyses the economic challenges facing Irish people and the impact of policies put in place by Government. It sets out five key policy areas it proposes should be addressed simultaneously if we are to build a fairer future i.e. macroeconomic stability, just taxation, social protection, governance and sustainability.  Below is a podcast outlining the contents of the review.

Robert Watt, Secretary General of the Department of Public Expenditure and Reform presented a paper examining the fiscal challenges facing Ireland at the Social Justice Ireland Social Policy Conference 2013.  The paper addressed State expenditure, new fiscal rules and sustaining social cohesion.

Dr Patricia O’Hara presented a paper at Social Justice Ireland's Social Policy Conference 2013 entitled ‘What Future for the Regions?’ The paper examines the regions during the boom and after the collapse and policy options for the future.

The paper is available here.

Presentation and Q & A are available to view below.

Isvtán P. Svékely, European Commission DG for Economic and Financial Affairs, presented a paper at the Social Policy Conference 2013 which examined social developments in Ireland at the time of fiscal consolidation.  The paper explored social indicators and challenges ahead.  It was co-authored by Miroslav Florián.

A new study from Social Justice Ireland published January 14th, 2013, shows that Ireland is further away from achieving its targets on employment, poverty and social inclusion than it was when these targets were originally set two years previously.

The Government’s Renewable Energy Strategy document does not contain any measureable outputs, policy goals or short, medium or long-term implementation plans in order to reach the stated targets. 

It would be totally unacceptable for Government to introduce a process of social dialogue that would benefit the rich and exclude the rest of us according to Social Justice Ireland, commenting on a proposal presented by the General Secretary of Impact, Mr Shay Cody recently. 

The Government has reduced its growth forecast for 2012 from 1.3% to 0.7% and for 2013 from 2.4% to 2.2%. The revised forecasts were outlined in the  Stability Programme Update- April 2012

Is the Irish Government’s economic outlook for the period to 2015 credible given the Central Bank’s most recent forecast on economic growth? Social Justice Ireland has serious doubts in this regard.

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