Policy issues concerning Inequality

Social Justice Ireland publication wins award

Social Justice Ireland's recent book entitled "Basic Income: Radical Utopia or Practical Solution" has received an award for original work in Irish Fiscal Policy from Ireland's Foundation for Fiscal Studies, Fiscal.ie. The award was made today (October 2nd, 2017) as part of the Fiscal.ie announcment of the Miriam Hederman O'Brien Award. Fiscal.ie said the award was being made to Social Justice Ireland "in recognition of your outstanding work". The  full text of this publication (edited by Social Justice Ireland Directors, Brigid Reynolds and Seán Healy) is available here and may be downloaded free of charge.

Universal Basic Income - an idea whose time has almost come

Social Justice Ireland's work on developing a Universal Basic Income for Ireland was acknowledged by Noel Whelan in his op-ed article in The Irish Times on September 15, 2017.  In this article Noel argues that a universal basic income has the potential to transform how we organise the State’s role in our society and economy and concludes it is an idea whose time has almost come.   The full article may be accessed here.

Ireland not making progress in meeting Europe 2020 Targets

Ireland is not making progress towards meeting some of its Europe 2020 Targets.  This is one of the main findings of Social Justice Ireland's  latest report, Ireland and the Europe 2020 Strategy.  The report finds that Ireland needs to make greater efforts to meet the Europe 2020 targets on employment and reducing poverty and social exclusion.

Failure to address social challenges is undermining confidence in the EU

Economic recovery has yet to be experienced by large numbers of people in Europe.  Many remain excluded as they continue to lose out in employment, education, healthcare, poverty and related services.  This is undermining the confidence many people had in the European project because they see the EU constantly giving priority to economic issues ahead of social challenges.

Despite recovery almost 230,000 children in poverty

Since the onset of the recession the number of people in poverty in Ireland has increased by more than 100,000.   Today there are more than 750,000 people living in poverty in Ireland; this is a major concern.  More than 57 per cent of those in poverty are not connected to the labour market; they are people who are retired, students, people in caring roles or people who are ill or people with a disability.

Gender Gap remains in global labour market

Despite some modest gains in some regions in the world, millions of women are losing ground in their quest for equality in the world of work, according to a new report prepared by the International Labour Organization (ILO). The report, Women at Work: Trends 2016  examined data for up to 178 countries and concludes that inequality between women and men persists across a wide spectrum of the global labour market.

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