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Policy issues concerning Taxation

There has been a profound failure of policy across the EU since the 2008 crash, a failure that raises serious questions concerning the EU’s commitment to protecting its millions of powerless and vulnerable people, according to Social Justice Ireland’s latest research study on EU developments.

We are focussing far too much on the performance of the economy and not nearly enough on issues such as aging, social housing and sustainability, that have major implications for the wellbeing of individuals and society as a whole according to the National Social Monitor 2015 published by Social Justice Ireland.  It goes on to argue that a balance is required between the various aspects of life if the wellbeing of this and future generations is to be secured.

Tax cuts will not solve Ireland’s infrastructure problems, will not improve social services and will not deliver a fairer society.  Government, at the National Economic Dialogue, should take a long-term view and promote the common good by using all available resource to invest in Ireland’s social and physical infrastructure and services. This approach would lay the foundations for Ireland to deal with the many social, economic and demographic challenges it is currently facing and generate social and economic returns for the state.

The cost of obesity could more than quadruple within the next 15 years to a total of €1,175 a year for every man woman and child in the State unless more is done to tackle the problem, a joint Irish Heart Foundation and Social Justice Ireland report has revealed.

Taxation plays a key role in shaping Irish society through funding public services, supporting economic activity and redistributing resources to enhance the fairness of society.  This forms a core element of Social Justice Ireland’s Policy Framework for a Just Ireland. A full analysis of the challenges and our proposals on Taxation are contained in our Socio-Economic Review 2015 ‘Towards a Just Society’.  The chapter is available below.

The scale and severity of the 2008-2010 economic collapse saw Ireland revert to the phenomenon of widespread unemployment.   The scale and nature of our unemployment crisis deserves greater attention, in particular given the scale of long-term unemployment. Addressing unemployment and the need for investment are key parts of Social Justice Ireland’s Policy Framework for a Just Ireland. A full analysis of the challenges and our proposals on Work are contained in our Socio-Economic Review 2015 ‘Towards a Just Society’.  The chapter is available below.

As part of our Socio-Economic Review 2015 'Towards a Just Society' Social Justice Ireland sets out its views on how Ireland can ensure the future does not repeat the mistakes of the past. It sets out a guiding vision for a just society and a policy framework that would deliver a just future for all.  This policy framework is available below.

‘Cherishing all Equally’, a new report by the independent think-tank, TASC, has revealed yawning gaps in income distribution in Ireland.

New research on the total amount of tax Irish people pay finds that the poorest 10% of households pay a larger share of their income in tax than the richest 10%.  When income tax and indirect taxes such as VAT are included in the calculations the study conducted by the Nevin Economic Research Institute finds that:

The latest edition of 'Taxation Trends in the EU' (published June 16, 2014) shows that once again Ireland’s total tax-take is one of the lowest in the Union. It now stands at 28.7% of GDP compared to an EU average of 39.4%.  It is clear that if Ireland is to aspire to services and infrastructure at an EU-average level then it must move its total tax-take towards that EU average. 

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