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Policy issues concerning Well Being

In the most recent, and high-profile, mortgage sale, Permanent TSB this week announced its intention to sell 14,000 non-performing mortgage loans.  Some commentators have suggested that, instead of selling these loans, that individual borrowers be allowed to ‘make a deal’ with the lender to buy the loan at the intended sale price.  However, this solution is too simplistic. 

Current welfare systems were not designed to adapt to the challenges presented by automation and globalisation and are not fit for purpose. That's the view of a new paper from the Adam Smith Institute in the UK published to coincide with the World Economic Forum meeting in Davos this week. The institute argues that governments should look to Universal Basic Income (UBI) experiments around the world as they seek to address the risks posed by large-scale changes to the labour market while retaining the benefits of trade and technological progress.

Social Justice Ireland's recent book entitled Basic Income: Radical Utopia or Practical Solution? has received an award for original work in Irish Fiscal Policy from Ireland's Foundation for Fiscal Studies, Fiscal.ie.

Social Justice Ireland's work on developing a Universal Basic Income for Ireland was acknowledged by Noel Whelan in his op-ed article in The Irish Times on September 15, 2017.

Ireland is making poor progress when ranked against the other 14 countries in the EU-15.  The new Sustainable Progress Index, published  by Social Justice Ireland to mark UN World Social Justice Day, February 20, 2017, shows the scale of the challenge facing Ireland under the headings of economy, society and environment.

We are focussing far too much on the performance of the economy and not nearly enough on issues such as aging, social housing and sustainability, that have major implications for the wellbeing of individuals and society as a whole according to the National Social Monitor 2015 published by Social Justice Ireland.  It goes on to argue that a balance is required between the various aspects of life if the wellbeing of this and future generations is to be secured.

A discussion of the values underpinning decisions before and after the crisis forms part of the final chapter of our Socio-Economic Review 2015 'Towards a Just Society'.  This chapter is available below.

The provision of, and access to, a level of public services regarded as acceptable by Irish society generally forms the Decent Services Pillar of Social Justice Ireland’s Policy Framework for a Just Ireland. A full analysis of the challenges and our proposals on Public Services are contained in our Socio-Economic Review 2015 ‘Towards a Just Society’.  The chapter is available below.

As part of our Socio-Economic Review 2015 'Towards a Just Society' Social Justice Ireland sets out its views on how Ireland can ensure the future does not repeat the mistakes of the past. It sets out a guiding vision for a just society and a policy framework that would deliver a just future for all.  This policy framework is available below.

Ensuring that adequate and appropriate accommodation is available for all people and the development an equitable system for allocating resources within the housing sector forms a core piece of Social Justice Ireland’s Policy Framework for a Just Ireland. A full analysis of the policy challenges and proposals on Housing are outlined in our Socio-Economic Review 2015 ‘Towards a Just Society’.  The chapter is available below.

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