Policy issues concerning Work

Social Justice Ireland publication wins award

Social Justice Ireland's recent book entitled "Basic Income: Radical Utopia or Practical Solution" has received an award for original work in Irish Fiscal Policy from Ireland's Foundation for Fiscal Studies, Fiscal.ie. The award was made today (October 2nd, 2017) as part of the Fiscal.ie announcment of the Miriam Hederman O'Brien Award. Fiscal.ie said the award was being made to Social Justice Ireland "in recognition of your outstanding work". The  full text of this publication (edited by Social Justice Ireland Directors, Brigid Reynolds and Seán Healy) is available here and may be downloaded free of charge.

Universal Basic Income - an idea whose time has almost come

Social Justice Ireland's work on developing a Universal Basic Income for Ireland was acknowledged by Noel Whelan in his op-ed article in The Irish Times on September 15, 2017.  In this article Noel argues that a universal basic income has the potential to transform how we organise the State’s role in our society and economy and concludes it is an idea whose time has almost come.   The full article may be accessed here.

The gap between Ireland’s minimum wage and the living wage has major implications for living standards

Ireland’s National Minimum Wage does not allow people to live what is considered a minimum socially acceptable standard of living in Ireland, and the planned increase in 2018 will not do much to change that. The high proportion of workers earning below the Living Wage is the focus of Issue 5 of the Employment Monitor.

Gender Gap remains in global labour market

Despite some modest gains in some regions in the world, millions of women are losing ground in their quest for equality in the world of work, according to a new report prepared by the International Labour Organization (ILO). The report, Women at Work: Trends 2016  examined data for up to 178 countries and concludes that inequality between women and men persists across a wide spectrum of the global labour market.

Long-term unemployment crisis and precarious employment problematic

  • There are 272,000 fewer full-time jobs in Ireland today compared to 2007 (-15%).
  • The number of people in part-time jobs is 55,700 higher than in 2007 (+14%).
  • More than a quarter (115,500) of part-time workers are underemployed.
  • Between 2010 and end-2014 the number long-term unemployed fell by 48,700.
  • But, in the same period the net loss of Irish people to emigration was 123,800.
  • 58% of those unemployed are long-term unemployed (more than one year).

Social Justice Ireland's analysis and policy proposals on Work, Unemployment and Job Creation

The scale and severity of the 2008-2010 economic collapse saw Ireland revert to the phenomenon of widespread unemployment.   The scale and nature of our unemployment crisis deserves greater attention, in particular given the scale of long-term unemployment. Addressing unemployment and the need for investment are key parts of Social Justice Ireland’s Policy Framework for a Just Ireland. A full analysis of the challenges and our proposals on Work are contained in our Socio-Economic Review 2015 ‘Towards a Just Society’.  The chapter is available below.

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