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Policy issues concerning Work

Social Justice Ireland has partnered with Development Perspectives in support of their #SDGChallenge.  May is the month for SDG8 - Decent Work and Economic Growth.

Social Justice Ireland's recent book entitled Basic Income: Radical Utopia or Practical Solution? has received an award for original work in Irish Fiscal Policy from Ireland's Foundation for Fiscal Studies, Fiscal.ie.

Social Justice Ireland's work on developing a Universal Basic Income for Ireland was acknowledged by Noel Whelan in his op-ed article in The Irish Times on September 15, 2017.

Ireland’s National Minimum Wage does not allow people to live what is considered a minimum socially acceptable standard of living in Ireland, and the planned increase in 2018 will not do much to change that. The high proportion of workers earning below the Living Wage is the focus of Issue 5 of the Employment Monitor.

A brief snapshot on how Ireland is performing in terms of job creation and some policy proposals.

Despite some modest gains in some regions in the world, millions of women are losing ground in their quest for equality in the world of work, according to a new report prepared by the International Labour Organization (ILO). The report, Women at Work: Trends 2016  examined data for up to 178 countries and concludes that inequality between women and men persists across a wide spectrum of the global labour market.

There has been a profound failure of policy across the EU since the 2008 crash, a failure that raises serious questions concerning the EU’s commitment to protecting its millions of powerless and vulnerable people, according to Social Justice Ireland’s latest research study on EU developments.

  • There are 272,000 fewer full-time jobs in Ireland today compared to 2007 (-15%).
  • The number of people in part-time jobs is 55,700 higher than in 2007 (+14%).
  • More than a quarter (115,500) of part-time workers are underemployed.
  • Between 2010 and end-2014 the number long-term unemployed fell by 48,700.
  • But, in the same period the net loss of Irish people to emigration was 123,800.
  • 58% of those unemployed are long-term unemployed (more than one year).

The Government’s Low Pay Commission should agree to raise the minimum wage towards the living wage level and should also make the two basic income tax credits refundable if they are to really address the ‘working poor’ issue.

The scale and severity of the 2008-2010 economic collapse saw Ireland revert to the phenomenon of widespread unemployment.   The scale and nature of our unemployment crisis deserves greater attention, in particular given the scale of long-term unemployment. Addressing unemployment and the need for investment are key parts of Social Justice Ireland’s Policy Framework for a Just Ireland. A full analysis of the challenges and our proposals on Work are contained in our Socio-Economic Review 2015 ‘Towards a Just Society’.  The chapter is available below.

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