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Budget Choices

Budget 2016 was the fifth regressive Budget in a row. While it was not as regressive as in previous years and contained some gain for everyone, there was much more for the better off and far less for poor and vulnerable people. 

While single unemployed people will gain €95 a year, single people earning €75,000 will gain almost ten times as much i.e. €902.  In the case of couples, the unemployed will gain €157 a year while a couple with two earners on €125,000 a year will gain nine times as much i.e. an extra €1,408 a year.

In this detailed briefing document, Social Justice Ireland outlines a series of investment packages, and a corresponding series of tax reform proposals, for Budget 2016. 

Social Justice Ireland has called on Finance Minister, Michael Noonan TD, to RAISE taxes and not reduce them in the Budget for 2016.  This is not the time for Tax-Cuts. All available resources should be used to invest in addressing Ireland’s major deficits, in areas such as caring, housing and poverty that affect the young, the old and most in between.

Fourth regressive Budget in a row

Budget 2015 is the fourth regressive budget in a row.  While it contains a number of welcome initiatives and positive developments, overall the Budget is deeply disappointing.

Some income tax proposals currently being considered by Government should be rejected because they would give far greater benefit to people earning higher incomes while giving nothing to lower income employees according to a new study conducted by Social Justice Ireland.

Social Justice Ireland policy briefing Budget Choices 2015 outlines a fully costed alternative budget and presents a series of proposals for Budget 2015 that would see Ireland’s borrowing reduced to below 3% of GDP, make the tax system fairer, protect public services, protect vulnerable people and invest in Ireland's social infrastructure.

       Government should increase basic social welfare rates and PAYE tax credits by €5 in Budget 2014

This is essential because the value of basic social welfare payments has fallen when measured against average weekly earnings across all employment sectors since the downturn began.  The Old Age Pension system should be replaced with a universal pension paid at the current rate of the Contributory Old Age Pension.

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