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Budget

Some tax proposals currently being considered by Government should be rejected because they would give far greater benefit to people earning higher incomes than to lower income employees.  While there should be no net reduction in tax in Budget 2017, a study conducted by Social Justice Ireland, published today, shows that the impact of some proposals currently being considered would be profoundly unfair because they would favour only those with higher incomes. 

An adequate investment programme focused on social housing and broadband delivery must be one of the key initiatives in Budget 2017.  Budget 2017 should introduce substantially increased investment to begin delivering sufficient social housing units to eliminate the waiting list and to frontload the rollout of the fibre infrastructure for broadband to every household and business in the State.

Budget 2016 was the fifth regressive Budget in a row. While it was not as regressive as in previous years and contained some gain for everyone, there was much more for the better off and far less for poor and vulnerable people. 

While single unemployed people will gain €95 a year, single people earning €75,000 will gain almost ten times as much i.e. €902.  In the case of couples, the unemployed will gain €157 a year while a couple with two earners on €125,000 a year will gain nine times as much i.e. an extra €1,408 a year.

Some tax proposals currently being considered by Government should be rejected because they would give far greater benefit to people earning higher incomes while giving nothing to lower income employees according to a study conducted by Social Justice Ireland.   The study shows that four of seven options to reduce income tax currently being considered would be profoundly unfair because they would favour only those with higher incomes.

This study examines 8 of the options currently being considered by Government as possible changes to income tax levels as policy reform for Budget 2016.  It examines the 8 options from the perspective of fairness.
 

In this detailed briefing document, Social Justice Ireland outlines a series of investment packages, and a corresponding series of tax reform proposals, for Budget 2016. 

Social Justice Ireland has called on Finance Minister, Michael Noonan TD, to RAISE taxes and not reduce them in the Budget for 2016.  This is not the time for Tax-Cuts. All available resources should be used to invest in addressing Ireland’s major deficits, in areas such as caring, housing and poverty that affect the young, the old and most in between.

The Government’s Spring Statement is unfair, contradictory and disappointing.  It lacks a clear guiding vision of where Ireland should be by 2020.  It also lacks clear policy commitments that would move Ireland towards being a just society.

Social Justice Ireland's Response to the Government's Spring Economic Statement 2015 may be accessed here.

  • There are 272,000 fewer full-time jobs in Ireland today compared to 2007 (-15%).
  • The number of people in part-time jobs is 55,700 higher than in 2007 (+14%).
  • More than a quarter (115,500) of part-time workers are underemployed.
  • Between 2010 and end-2014 the number long-term unemployed fell by 48,700.
  • But, in the same period the net loss of Irish people to emigration was 123,800.
  • 58% of those unemployed are long-term unemployed (more than one year).

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