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Budget

The full text of a Policy Briefing on Work, Jobs and Unemployment, published by Social Justice Ireland on April 27, 2015 may be accessed here.
 

The troika made a major mistake in deciding the terms of Ireland’s bailout programme when they failed to factor in its social impact according to Minister for Finance Michael Noonan.

Speaking at the IMF conference in Dublin Castle last Monday, he said the same mistake had also been made in other countries when they failed to consider the effects that austerity policies would have on people.

Revised Estimates Budget 2015 provides additional details and information in relation to the allocations contained in the 2015 Estimates, which were set out in the Comprehensive Expenditure Report 2015-2017, published by the Department of Public Expenditure and Reform on 14 October 2014.  

Social Justice Ireland welcomes the publication of the ESRI Special Article examining the ‘Distributional Impact of Tax, Welfare and Public Service Pay Policies: Budget 2015 and Budgets 2009-2015’.  The ESRI report confirms Social Justice Ireland’s analysis that Budget 2015 was the fourth regressive budget in a row and a budget which widened the rich-poor gap.

ESRI Special Article: Distributional Impact of Tax, Welfare and Public Service Pay Policies; Budget 2015 and Budgets 2009-2015.  This article examines the impact of Budgetary policy decisions on different income declies.

Social Justice Ireland's analysis and critique of Budget 2015 is available to read below.

Reducing taxes is not Social Justice Ireland's priority for Budget 2015. Any available money should be used to improve Ireland's social services and infrastructure, reduce poverty and social exclusion and increase the number of jobs.

Social Justice Ireland policy briefing Budget Choices 2015 outlines a fully costed alternative budget and presents a series of proposals for Budget 2015 that would see Ireland’s borrowing reduced to below 3% of GDP, make the tax system fairer, protect public services, protect vulnerable people and invest in Ireland's social infrastructure.

The latest edition of 'Taxation Trends in the EU' (published June 16, 2014) shows that once again Ireland’s total tax-take is one of the lowest in the Union. It now stands at 28.7% of GDP compared to an EU average of 39.4%.  It is clear that if Ireland is to aspire to services and infrastructure at an EU-average level then it must move its total tax-take towards that EU average. 

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