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Demographics

In order to improve the wellbeing of everyone in society, at all stages of the life cycle, it is vital that our policies address the causes of problems rather than their symptoms only.  It is through this lens that Social Justice Ireland examines the ten policy areas in the National Social Monitor. 

The Government has failed to respond adequately to our nation’s housing crisis. There are almost 87,000 households on social housing waiting lists - over half of whom are families - and 10,000 homeless, of whom 3,600 are children. This is a national emergency. The impact of homelessness and precarious housing on our nation’s children will be felt for generations to come.

With 10,000 people - including 3,600 children - homeless, 72,000 mortgages in arrears, and 87,000 households on social housing waiting lists, it can hardly be denied that Government policy is a dramatic failure.

Social Justice Ireland’s annual Socio-Economic Review is entitled Social Justice Matters. This book is about charting a course to a better Ireland. At the foundation of that is how we raise taxes and how much tax we raise.

The Government’s new Pensions plan has missed the opportunity to provide a Universal Pension as a basic right to all citizens. It has also failed to address major issues around equity, sustainability and bureaucracy that have underpinned Ireland’s pension system for generations. Read Social Justice Ireland's new report: A Universal State Social Welfare Pension.

The current approach to housing policy in Ireland is not working; the private sector will never build social housing units on the scale required.  Government must commit to building sufficient social housing units to eliminate the current housing waiting list.  This is the only way to address Ireland’s ongoing housing and homelessness crisis.  This is a key finding of Social Justice Ireland's National Social Monitor 2017.

The CSO recently published part 2 in a series of summary results from Census 2016 covering areas such as employment, socio-economic groups, skills, labour force participation and health.  This document highlights some very challenging trends in Ireland.  This data should guide and inform policy making in the areas of employment, education and training, caring, health and transport. 

Social Justice Ireland’s annual Socio-Economic Review is entitled 'A New Social Contract for a New Century'.  This review argues that Ireland's present social contract is broken and that 2017 is the perfect opportunity to develop a new and radical social contract for Ireland’s second century.

A full analysis of the challenges facing Ireland in terms of migration and combatting racism,  promoting real participation and deliberative democracy.  Our policy proposals are contained in our Socio-Economic Review 2017 ‘A New Social Contract for a New Century’.  The chapter is available below.

A full analysis of the challenges facing Ireland in terms of promoting real participation and deliberative democracy, along with our policy proposals, is contained in our Socio-Economic Review 2018, Social Justice Matters. The chapter is available below.

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