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Employment

Over 100,000 people are currently working part-time hours, but would take full-time employment if they could find it.  This figure has increased by 25 per cent since 2008 and points to a worrying employment trend in Ireland.  This is one of the key findings from Social Justice Ireland's latest Employment Monitor. Some of this part-time work gives rise to increased dependency on state income supports.

This report is the third issue of Social Justice Ireland’s Employment Monitor; a quarterly output examining Ireland’s employment situation, including employment numbers, significant labour market trends, and other aspects of the macro-economy.  In this issue, the Employment Monitor focuses on underemployment, low pay, and income adequacy.

The latest issue of Social Justice Ireland's Employment Monitor examines regional employment trends.  Figures released in August by the Central Statistics Office (CSO) show a wide divergence in the experiences of Ireland’s different regions as regards unemployment and job creation trends.

The latest issue of Social Justice Ireland's quarterly employment monitor examines rural and regional trends in employment, unemployment and labour force participation.

Government should spend €1bn fiscal space on infrastructure to improve productivity and competitiveness in Budget 2017.  This would be a far better use of resources than giving tax cuts as incentives to attract ‘Brexit refugees’ from the City of London to Dublin.  Investment is crucial to addressing Ireland’s infrastructure deficits and to delivering a vibrant, productive, competitive and sustainable economy and a just society.  Investment is the cornerstone of our policy briefing Budget Choices 2017.

Budget Choices 2017 outlines Social Justice Ireland's comprehensive proposals and policies and policies that can deliver a vibrant economy, a just society and a sustainable future.

Despite falling rates of unemployment and almost 47,000 jobs (net) being created in the year to end Q1 2016, the Jobs Gap stood at 166,200 at the end of March, and overall the economy was 193,100 jobs short of its peak performance in 2007. The "Jobs Gap” is the number of jobs that must be created in order to return to the peak employment levels of 2007, while adjusting for changes in the make-up of the labour force. It is a realistic indicator of the number of jobs required to meet demand, accounting for things like migration and demographic trends.

Social Justice Ireland's quarterly Employment Monitor is available to download here.
 

The focus of the Programme for Government and 32nd Dáil must be on investment in infrastructure and services.  Lack of investment in housing, health, childcare, rural broadband and education threatens economic growth and stability.   The latest research from Social Justice Ireland  in ‘Choices for Equity and Sustainability’ shows that a lack of investment is undermining Ireland’s economic and social stability. 

Despite some modest gains in some regions in the world, millions of women are losing ground in their quest for equality in the world of work, according to a new report prepared by the International Labour Organization (ILO). The report, Women at Work: Trends 2016  examined data for up to 178 countries and concludes that inequality between women and men persists across a wide spectrum of the global labour market.

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