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Employment

The National Youth Council of Ireland (NYCI) report “JobBridge: Stepping Stone or Dead End?” explores the views and experiences of young people aged 18-25 who participated in the National Internship Scheme, JobBridge

This article was originally published here. It was written by Selim Jahan Director of the UN Human Development Report Office

From a human development perspective, work, rather than jobs or employment is the relevant concept.

Social Justice Ireland strongly endorses the call by Ireland’s largest trade union to “battle” for low-paid vulnerable workers by seeking acceptance by employers of a living wage of €11.45 an hour.

Government policies are further excluding people who are already clinging to the margins of society, according to a new review from Social Justice Ireland. The Review analyses how Ireland is performing with regard to key national targets under the Europe 2020 Strategy.

‘Ireland and the Europe 2020 Strategy, 2015’ covers the social inclusion aspects of EU 2020 that were addressed in the Irish National Reform Programme. This Review is the fourth in a series of annual reviews of Ireland’s performance in the Europe 2020 Strategy conducted by Social Justice Ireland.

Social Justice Ireland welcomes the news that 37% of IDA-led investments were in regions outside Dublin and Cork in 2014.  This is an improvement on the 2013 figure of 30%, but Social Justice Ireland reminds the Government that €200m must be invested in high-speed broadband outside Ireland’s major cities to create vital and sustainable employment by indigenous companies and multinational firms. 

The 2014 Living Wage for the Republic of Ireland has been calculated by the Living Wage Technical Group at €11.45 per hour.  Social Justice Ireland believes this should become the minimum wage and should be adopted by all employers, public and private, without delay.
The Living Wage Technical Group, of which Social Justice Ireland is a member, has also launched:

This is the fulll technical document underpinning the calculation of a Living Wage.  It was prepared, and will be updated, by the Living Wage Technical Group of which Social Justice Ireland is a member.

This is a summary of the Living Wage published July 2014.  Social Justice Ireland is a member of the Living Wage Technical Group that calculates and updates the Living Wage rate.

Issues relating to the concept of work, unemployment levels, under- employment, long term unemployment, investment programme, working poor, tax credits made refundable are discussed in the podcast below.  The relevant chapter from our Socio-Economic Review 2014 is available here.

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