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Some tax proposals currently being considered by Government should be rejected because they would give far greater benefit to people earning higher incomes while giving nothing to lower income employees according to a study conducted by Social Justice Ireland.   The study shows that four of seven options to reduce income tax currently being considered would be profoundly unfair because they would favour only those with higher incomes.

This study examines 8 of the options currently being considered by Government as possible changes to income tax levels as policy reform for Budget 2016.  It examines the 8 options from the perspective of fairness.
 

Tax cuts will not solve Ireland’s infrastructure problems, will not improve social services and will not deliver a fairer society.  Government, at the National Economic Dialogue, should take a long-term view and promote the common good by using all available resource to invest in Ireland’s social and physical infrastructure and services. This approach would lay the foundations for Ireland to deal with the many social, economic and demographic challenges it is currently facing and generate social and economic returns for the state.

In this detailed briefing document, Social Justice Ireland outlines a series of investment packages, and a corresponding series of tax reform proposals, for Budget 2016. 

Social Justice Ireland has called on Finance Minister, Michael Noonan TD, to RAISE taxes and not reduce them in the Budget for 2016.  This is not the time for Tax-Cuts. All available resources should be used to invest in addressing Ireland’s major deficits, in areas such as caring, housing and poverty that affect the young, the old and most in between.

The Government’s Spring Statement is unfair, contradictory and disappointing.  It lacks a clear guiding vision of where Ireland should be by 2020.  It also lacks clear policy commitments that would move Ireland towards being a just society.

Social Justice Ireland's Response to the Government's Spring Economic Statement 2015 may be accessed here.

The troika made a major mistake in deciding the terms of Ireland’s bailout programme when they failed to factor in its social impact according to Minister for Finance Michael Noonan.

Speaking at the IMF conference in Dublin Castle last Monday, he said the same mistake had also been made in other countries when they failed to consider the effects that austerity policies would have on people.

The Irish State should play a greater role in industrial development, basing its decisions on skilful evidence-based analysis and deeper democratic participation, speakers stated in a round-table discussion at Social Justice Ireland’s 2014 Policy Conference.

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