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Health

The National Social Monitor 2014 outlines the present situation on a range of policy issues that impact on people’s well-being.  Social Justice Ireland presents the National Social Monitor as a contribution to the public debate that is urgently needed on Ireland’s future and how Ireland is performing in terms of promoting the wellbeing of all in society. 

The WHO Regional Office for Europe  has just published the Review of social determinants and the health divide in the WHO European Region, coordinated by University College London’s Institute of Health Equity. 

The HSE has published its National Service Plan for 2013 which outlines the details of planned savings of €721m in 2013.  The plan aims to reduce staff numbers by 4,000 this year (4% of the workforce) which will have an inevitable impact on frontline services.

The Health Service Executive Service Plan 2013.

Austerity is not just bad for the economy. The latest evidence shows that it is also bad for people’s health. 

Social Justice Ireland welcomes the NESC report Quality and Standards in Human Services in Ireland: Disability Services which has just been published. The report reviews existing regulation and quality processes in Ireland’s disability services, drawing on interviews with a range of stakeholders.

A joint OECD and European Commission report on Health expenditure.

The CSO has just published the latest profile of the Census 2011 results “Profile 8 Our bill of Health – Health, Disability and Carers in Ireland”.  The publication presents a profile of the health of the Irish population, focusing in detail on disability and carers who provide unpaid assistance.  Social Justice Ireland welcomes this report and the evidence and analysis that it provides.  This evidence and analysis should be used to inform and underpin public policy in the areas of health, disability and carers.

Health spending in Europe in 2010 fell for the first time in decades. This is one of the many findings in the "Health at a Glance: Europe 2012", a new joint report by the OECD and the European Commission. From an annual average growth rate of 4.6% between 2000 and 2009, health spending per person fell to -0.6% in 2010. This is the first time that health spending has fallen in Europe since 1975. In Ireland, health spending fell 7.9% in 2010, compared with an average annual growth rate of 6.5% between 2000 and 2009. 

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