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Income Distribution

Reducing taxes is not Social Justice Ireland's priority for Budget 2015. Any available money should be used to improve Ireland's social services and infrastructure, reduce poverty and social exclusion and increase the number of jobs.

The 2014 Living Wage for the Republic of Ireland has been calculated by the Living Wage Technical Group at €11.45 per hour.  Social Justice Ireland believes this should become the minimum wage and should be adopted by all employers, public and private, without delay.
The Living Wage Technical Group, of which Social Justice Ireland is a member, has also launched:

This is the fulll technical document underpinning the calculation of a Living Wage.  It was prepared, and will be updated, by the Living Wage Technical Group of which Social Justice Ireland is a member.

Social Justice Ireland  presents a viable policy framework that would secure both solidarity and sustainable recovery in the decade ahead.

The CSO published the ‘Household Budget Survey 2009-2010’ which gives an interesting snapshot into  changes in household expenditure.

Points of note from Household Budget Survey 2009-2010

  • Proportion of total household expenditure on Food dropped by almost 2% between 2004-2005 and 2009-2010.
  • Proportion of total household expenditure on Housing increased by 6% in the same period.
  • Average weekly expenditure on Fuel and Light is 15.3% higher than it was five years ago.

Social Justice Ireland's Policy Briefing on Poverty and Income Distribution 

The Vincentian Partnership for Social Justice and MABS National Development Ltd. have launched a Minimum Income Standard calculator for Irish households. This tool will allow households to calculate the cost of a Minimum Essential Standard of Living. 

The number of people at risk of poverty in Ireland has grown from 14.1% in 2009 to 15.8% in 2010 according to the latest Survey on Income and Living Condidtions (SILC) conducted by the Central Statistics Office (CSO).

More than three quarters of the savings came from correcting errors made by Department of Social Protection staff

Most social welfare rates are not adequate to provide a standard of living seen as socially acceptable in Ireland according to a study conducted by the Vincentian Partnership for Social Justice and Trinity College.

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