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Public Expenditure

'What should Ireland do now' - the paper presented by Social Justice Ireland at the Social Policy Conference 2015 is available to download below.
 

In this detailed briefing document, Social Justice Ireland outlines a series of investment packages, and a corresponding series of tax reform proposals, for Budget 2016. 

Social Justice Ireland has called on Finance Minister, Michael Noonan TD, to RAISE taxes and not reduce them in the Budget for 2016.  This is not the time for Tax-Cuts. All available resources should be used to invest in addressing Ireland’s major deficits, in areas such as caring, housing and poverty that affect the young, the old and most in between.

The Government’s Spring Statement is unfair, contradictory and disappointing.  It lacks a clear guiding vision of where Ireland should be by 2020.  It also lacks clear policy commitments that would move Ireland towards being a just society.

Social Justice Ireland's Response to the Government's Spring Economic Statement 2015 may be accessed here.

As part of our Socio-Economic Review 2015 'Towards a Just Society' Social Justice Ireland sets out its views on how Ireland can ensure the future does not repeat the mistakes of the past. It sets out a guiding vision for a just society and a policy framework that would deliver a just future for all.  This policy framework is available below.

The provision of, and access to, a level of public services regarded as acceptable by Irish society generally forms the Decent Services Pillar of Social Justice Ireland’s Policy Framework for a Just Ireland. A full analysis of the challenges and our proposals on Public Services are contained in our Socio-Economic Review 2015 ‘Towards a Just Society’.  The chapter is available below.

Revised Estimates Budget 2015 provides additional details and information in relation to the allocations contained in the 2015 Estimates, which were set out in the Comprehensive Expenditure Report 2015-2017, published by the Department of Public Expenditure and Reform on 14 October 2014.  

The OECD and the Irish Fiscal Advisory Council have both published reports outlining the significant challenges ahead for Ireland and Europe in terms of economic recovery.  The publication of these reports reinforces the need for long-term planning to be at the heart of policy making in order to deliver the services and infrastructure that will be required in the years ahead. 

Ireland needs a combination of vision and pragmatic policies that can truly move the country towards a desirable and sustainable future. The lack of a “guiding vision” in Ireland has led to a lack of coherence at the core of public policy.  The need for long-term planning, a new social contract and a guiding vision to underpin policy were among the issues addressed at Social Justice Ireland's Social Policy Conference 2014.

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