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Social Dialogue

Tax cuts will not solve Ireland’s infrastructure problems, will not improve social services and will not deliver a fairer society.  Government, at the National Economic Dialogue, should take a long-term view and promote the common good by using all available resource to invest in Ireland’s social and physical infrastructure and services. This approach would lay the foundations for Ireland to deal with the many social, economic and demographic challenges it is currently facing and generate social and economic returns for the state.

Social Justice Ireland's policy proposals on participation, supporting the Community and Voluntary Sector and ensuring all voices are heard in Social Dialogue and a local and national level are available to download here.

As part of our Socio-Economic Review 2015 'Towards a Just Society' Social Justice Ireland sets out its views on how Ireland can ensure the future does not repeat the mistakes of the past. It sets out a guiding vision for a just society and a policy framework that would deliver a just future for all.  This policy framework is available below.

People have a right to participate in shaping the decisions that affect them and to participate in developing and shaping the society in which they live. These rights are part of Social Justice Ireland’s Governance policy pillar of our Policy Framework for a Just Ireland. 

A full analysis of the challenges facing Ireland and our policy proposals are contained in our Socio-Economic Review 2015 ‘Towards a Just Society’.  The chapter is available below.

Social Justice Ireland strongly endorses the call by Ireland’s largest trade union to “battle” for low-paid vulnerable workers by seeking acceptance by employers of a living wage of €11.45 an hour.

The troika made a major mistake in deciding the terms of Ireland’s bailout programme when they failed to factor in its social impact according to Minister for Finance Michael Noonan.

Speaking at the IMF conference in Dublin Castle last Monday, he said the same mistake had also been made in other countries when they failed to consider the effects that austerity policies would have on people.

Ireland is facing major choices,  They are the same choices that faced the country in the early 2000s.  They weren't addressed directly then and there is little evidence that they are being addressed directly now.  The chapters in Planning and Delivering a Fairer Future - Values, Democracy and Service Provision seek to address these choices.  They set out the challenges facing us and identify options, frameworks and pathways towards a future that would be just, sustainable and desirable.

  • Any proposal for social dialogue involving trade unions and employers only, and excluding large parts of society should be rejected.
  • Such a process would result in the available resources being divided between business and someemployees with all others depending on the crumbs that are left over.  

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