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Taxation

A brief snapshot of taxation trends in Ireland and some policy proposals.

Ireland, with a tax take of 31.1% of GDP (in 2014), is defined as a low-tax economy by Eurostat. This is part of the reason why our services and infrastructure do not measure up to European standards.  Any decision to raise or reduce Ireland’s overall taxation revenue should be linked to demands on government resources.

Social Justice Ireland's General Election briefing on Taxation.

'On Responsibility and Tax Policy: an exploration based on Ireland and Malawi' the paper presented by Dr. Sheila Killian at Social Justice Ireland's Social Policy Conference 2015 is available to download below. 
 

Budget 2016 was the fifth regressive Budget in a row. While it was not as regressive as in previous years and contained some gain for everyone, there was much more for the better off and far less for poor and vulnerable people. 

While single unemployed people will gain €95 a year, single people earning €75,000 will gain almost ten times as much i.e. €902.  In the case of couples, the unemployed will gain €157 a year while a couple with two earners on €125,000 a year will gain nine times as much i.e. an extra €1,408 a year.

Some tax proposals currently being considered by Government should be rejected because they would give far greater benefit to people earning higher incomes while giving nothing to lower income employees according to a study conducted by Social Justice Ireland.   The study shows that four of seven options to reduce income tax currently being considered would be profoundly unfair because they would favour only those with higher incomes.

The Healthy Ireland Study published today highlights the need for the introduction of a sugar sweetened drinks tax in order to combat the levels of obesity in Ireland and associated chronic conditions.

This study examines 8 of the options currently being considered by Government as possible changes to income tax levels as policy reform for Budget 2016.  It examines the 8 options from the perspective of fairness.
 

There has been a profound failure of policy across the EU since the 2008 crash, a failure that raises serious questions concerning the EU’s commitment to protecting its millions of powerless and vulnerable people, according to Social Justice Ireland’s latest research study on EU developments.

Europe: A Union for the Powerless as well as the Powerful? Review of the Social Situation in Europe and Considerations for a More Sustainable and Inclusive Future is the fourth report in Social Justice Ireland's European Research Series. This report adresses a series of key issues including unemployment, social investment, taxation and poverty and social exclusion across the EU 28 member states.  The report identifies key trends and makes policy proposals in key areas.

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