You are here

Taxation

As part of our Socio-Economic Review 2015 'Towards a Just Society' Social Justice Ireland sets out its views on how Ireland can ensure the future does not repeat the mistakes of the past. It sets out a guiding vision for a just society and a policy framework that would deliver a just future for all.  This policy framework is available below.

‘Cherishing all Equally’, a new report by the independent think-tank, TASC, has revealed yawning gaps in income distribution in Ireland.

TASC publication 'Cherishing all Equally' is the first detailed analysis of economic inequality in Ireland. It looks beyond income and wealth at a range of other issues including public services, taxation, family composition, people’s capacities and the cost of goods and services.

The OECD BEPS 2014 Deliverables is part of a series of documents and recommendations from the OECD examining a co-ordinated international approach to combat tax avoidance by multinational enterprises, under the OECD/G20 Base Erosion and Profit Shifting Project designed to create a single set of international tax rules to end the erosion of tax bases and the artificial shifting of profits to jurisdictions to avoid paying tax.

Some income tax proposals currently being considered by Government should be rejected because they would give far greater benefit to people earning higher incomes while giving nothing to lower income employees according to a new study conducted by Social Justice Ireland.

This paper examines the distributional impact of some of the income tax proposals currently being suggested by various members of Government and others. This study is a contribution to the debate and discussion which is currently taking place regarding income tax. 

Reducing taxes is not Social Justice Ireland's priority for Budget 2015. Any available money should be used to improve Ireland's social services and infrastructure, reduce poverty and social exclusion and increase the number of jobs.

New research on the total amount of tax Irish people pay finds that the poorest 10% of households pay a larger share of their income in tax than the richest 10%.  When income tax and indirect taxes such as VAT are included in the calculations the study conducted by the Nevin Economic Research Institute finds that:

Total Direct and Indirect Tax Contributions of Households in Ireland - NERI Working Paper Series.  Using data from the most recent Household Budget Survey, this paper estimates both the direct and indirect taxation contributions of households.

The latest edition of 'Taxation Trends in the EU' (published June 16, 2014) shows that once again Ireland’s total tax-take is one of the lowest in the Union. It now stands at 28.7% of GDP compared to an EU average of 39.4%.  It is clear that if Ireland is to aspire to services and infrastructure at an EU-average level then it must move its total tax-take towards that EU average. 

Pages