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Unemployment

This report is the fourth issue of Social Justice Ireland’s Employment Monitor; a quarterly output examining Ireland’s employment situation, including employment numbers, significant labour market trends, and other aspects of the macro-economy.  In this issue, the Employment Monitor focuses on regional trends in employment.

Over 100,000 people are currently working part-time hours, but would take full-time employment if they could find it.  This figure has increased by 25 per cent since 2008 and points to a worrying employment trend in Ireland.  This is one of the key findings from Social Justice Ireland's latest Employment Monitor. Some of this part-time work gives rise to increased dependency on state income supports.

This report is the third issue of Social Justice Ireland’s Employment Monitor; a quarterly output examining Ireland’s employment situation, including employment numbers, significant labour market trends, and other aspects of the macro-economy.  In this issue, the Employment Monitor focuses on underemployment, low pay, and income adequacy.

Economic recovery has yet to be experienced by large numbers of people in Europe.  Many remain excluded as they continue to lose out in employment, education, healthcare, poverty and related services.  This is undermining the confidence many people had in the European project because they see the EU constantly giving priority to economic issues ahead of social challenges.

'Europe: The Excluded Suffer while Europe Stagnates’ is the tenth publication in Social Justice Ireland’s European Research Series.  The report reviews the social situation in the 28 EU member states and makes some proposals and recommendations for a more sustainable and inclusive future.  It analyses performance in areas such as poverty and inequality, employment, access to key public services and taxation.  

The latest issue of Social Justice Ireland's Employment Monitor examines regional employment trends.  Figures released in August by the Central Statistics Office (CSO) show a wide divergence in the experiences of Ireland’s different regions as regards unemployment and job creation trends.

The latest issue of Social Justice Ireland's quarterly employment monitor examines rural and regional trends in employment, unemployment and labour force participation.

Despite falling rates of unemployment and almost 47,000 jobs (net) being created in the year to end Q1 2016, the Jobs Gap stood at 166,200 at the end of March, and overall the economy was 193,100 jobs short of its peak performance in 2007. The "Jobs Gap” is the number of jobs that must be created in order to return to the peak employment levels of 2007, while adjusting for changes in the make-up of the labour force. It is a realistic indicator of the number of jobs required to meet demand, accounting for things like migration and demographic trends.

Social Justice Ireland's quarterly Employment Monitor is available to download here.
 

The European Commission this week published the 2015 EU Youth Report. With regard to Ireland, the report reveals that Ireland recorded the highest fall in percentage points in its youth population since 2010 (-4 pp.). Ireland also recorded one of the largest proportions of young citizens leaving the country to settle in another EU Member State, although this trend is declining.

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