Social Justice Ireland  is an independent think tank and justice advocacy organisation that advances the lives of people and communities through providing independent social analysis and effective policy development to create a sustainable future for every member of society and for societies as a whole.  We work to build a just society through developing and delivering credible analysis and policy to improve society and the lives of people.  We identify sustainable options for the future and provide viable pathways forward.  In all of this we focus on human rights and the common good.

10 most recent posts

Tax cuts will not deliver a fairer society

Tax cuts will not solve Ireland’s infrastructure problems, will not improve social services and will not deliver a fairer society.  Government, at the National Economic Dialogue, should take a long-term view and promote the common good by using all available resource to invest in Ireland’s social and physical infrastructure and services. This approach would lay the foundations for Ireland to deal with the many social, economic and demographic challenges it is currently facing and generate social and economic returns for the state.

Tax cuts will hurt the old, the sick and the vulnerable

Social Justice Ireland has called on Finance Minister, Michael Noonan TD, to RAISE taxes and not reduce them in the Budget for 2016.  This is not the time for Tax-Cuts. All available resources should be used to invest in addressing Ireland’s major deficits, in areas such as caring, housing and poverty that affect the young, the old and most in between.

Pope Francis calls for radical changes to secure sustainability

Social Justice Ireland strongly endorses the key messages on climate change contained in the new encyclical from Pope Francis.  In this 184-page document entitled ‘On Care for Our Common Home’ Francis urgently calls on the entire world's population to act, lest we leave to coming generations a planet of "debris, desolation and filth."

Long-term unemployment crisis and precarious employment problematic

  • There are 272,000 fewer full-time jobs in Ireland today compared to 2007 (-15%).
  • The number of people in part-time jobs is 55,700 higher than in 2007 (+14%).
  • More than a quarter (115,500) of part-time workers are underemployed.
  • Between 2010 and end-2014 the number long-term unemployed fell by 48,700.
  • But, in the same period the net loss of Irish people to emigration was 123,800.
  • 58% of those unemployed are long-term unemployed (more than one year).

Government should roll out 90 Primary Care Networks by end of 2015

  • Government should roll out its proposed 90 Primary Care Networks before the end of 2015.
  • As resources become available from Ireland’s recovery priority must be given to securing decent services in areas such as health and education.
  • Essential infrastructure in areas such as social housing and disabilities should also be prioritised.
  • Access to health care at any age should not be determined by the content of one’s wallet.

European austerity fails to address social impacts

Austerity policies in the EU have contributed to intense economic suffering, particularly for young people and other vulnerable social groups, a new report has found. 123 million EU citizens – one in every four – are at risk of poverty or social exclusion – an increase of 7 million in the six years up to 2013.  An extra 8.4 million people became unemployed in the same period and almost one quarter of economically active young people in the EU are unemployed.  Young people constitute the largest group in the EU that is underemployed and feels discouraged in looking for work.

Recent publications

Living Wage 2015

The Living Wage technical paper for 2015 has just been published.  The 2015 Living Wage rate is €11.50 per hour. This is the average gross salary required by full-time employed adult (without dependents) to afford a socially acceptable minimum standard of living across Ireland.

Reducing obesity and future health costs - a proposal for health related taxation

Social Justice Ireland and the Irish Heart Foundation completed in-depth review of evidence on obesity and food poverty in Ireland in June 2015.  This report examines the future health costs of obesity and food poverty and makes a proposal for health related taxation as a policy instrument to address the challenge Ireland faces.

Recent podcasts/videos

Socio-Economic Review 2014 - Overview

Social Justice Ireland's Socio Economic Review 2014 'Steps Towards a Fairer Future' is a 320-page Review which analyses the economic challenges facing Irish people and the impact of policies put in place by Government. It sets out five key policy areas it proposes should be addressed simultaneously if we are to build a fairer future i.e. macroeconomic stability, just taxation, social protection, governance and sustainability.  Below is a podcast outlining the contents of the review.