Social Justice Ireland  is an independent think tank and justice advocacy organisation that advances the lives of people and communities through providing independent social analysis and effective policy development to create a sustainable future for every member of society and for societies as a whole.  We work to build a just society through developing and delivering credible analysis and policy to improve society and the lives of people.  We identify sustainable options for the future and provide viable pathways forward.  In all of this we focus on human rights and the common good.

Basic Income: Radical Utopia or Practical Solution? Social Policy Conference 2016 Registration Open

Social Justice Ireland’s Annual Social Policy Conference 2016 will focus on Basic Income, the theory behind it, and how it can be applied in practice.  Early bird rates now available - to register click here.

10 most recent posts

Budget tax proposals would favour those on highest incomes

Some tax proposals currently being considered by Government should be rejected because they would give far greater benefit to people earning higher incomes than to lower income employees.  While there should be no net reduction in tax in Budget 2017, a study conducted by Social Justice Ireland, published today, shows that the impact of some proposals currently being considered would be profoundly unfair because they would favour only those with higher incomes. 

Government should spend €1bn fiscal space on infrastructure

Government should spend €1bn fiscal space on infrastructure to improve productivity and competitiveness in Budget 2017.  This would be a far better use of resources than giving tax cuts as incentives to attract ‘Brexit refugees’ from the City of London to Dublin.  Investment is crucial to addressing Ireland’s infrastructure deficits and to delivering a vibrant, productive, competitive and sustainable economy and a just society.  Investment is the cornerstone of our policy briefing Budget Choices 2017.

Jobs Gap stands at 166,200 jobs

Despite falling rates of unemployment and almost 47,000 jobs (net) being created in the year to end Q1 2016, the Jobs Gap stood at 166,200 at the end of March, and overall the economy was 193,100 jobs short of its peak performance in 2007. The "Jobs Gap” is the number of jobs that must be created in order to return to the peak employment levels of 2007, while adjusting for changes in the make-up of the labour force. It is a realistic indicator of the number of jobs required to meet demand, accounting for things like migration and demographic trends.

Despite recovery almost 230,000 children in poverty

Since the onset of the recession the number of people in poverty in Ireland has increased by more than 100,000.   Today there are more than 750,000 people living in poverty in Ireland; this is a major concern.  More than 57 per cent of those in poverty are not connected to the labour market; they are people who are retired, students, people in caring roles or people who are ill or people with a disability.

Increase finance for social housing by invoking 'structural reform' clause of Stability and Growth Pact

Government could substantially increase the resources available to finance social housing by invoking the structural reform clause contained in the EU’s Stability and Growth Pact.This clause allows Government’s to cater for the short-term costs of implementing structural reforms that will have long-term positive budgetary effects.

Recent publications

Fairness in Changing Income Taxes

Despite low overall levels of taxation, and low effective income taxation rates, reductions in income taxation levels continue to be highlighted as a potential policy reform. Social Justice Ireland has undertaken this study to examine, from the perspective of fairness, various reform choices. As a minimum, the analysis highlights the distributive impact taxation policy choices can have and the potential policy has to pursue both fair and unfair outcomes.

Recent podcasts/videos